5 Reasons to Change Your Major and Stay in College For a Few More Years

It’s the college advice I give to everyone.  Take classes you’re interested in.  Wait a couple of years to declare a major and then Junior or Senior year change that sucker up and start afresh.  What’s the rush, anyway?  Seriously.  Here’s why:

1. Earning an adult paycheck is overrated.  You might be sick of doing group projects “for free” with people who annoy you, so you fantasize that it will all be much better when you’re getting paid “the big bucks”, but know that what you have to look forward to a cramming the same amount of work, much of it something you’re way less interested in than what you’re studying now, with a lot less time to do it in.  And you’ll be stuck with the same annoying people.  The huge paycheck that you think might make it all worth it?  It’s going to go to ridiculously boring things like new windows and furnaces and washing machines and your overpriced medical bills. Don’t complain about being so broke you are forced to eat $2.00 burgers at Burgerama, just enjoy the fact that you are able to get some chow with your pals.  Once you’re an adult you might eat more angus beef, but you’ll still feel broke and on top it if you usually have to make the patties yourself.  You’ll miss those greasy burgers and everything they represent.

2. Meeting new people will never be easier than it is now.  Right now if you strike up a conversation with someone sitting next to you at the coffee shop, or the library, it’s normal.  It’s expected. In the university setting there are endless opportunities for networking and forming friendships because everyone is new, so everyone introduces themselves.  Make as many connections as you can now, when you’re older there aren’t as many clubs or groups to join unless you already know people.  After college, there’s a point at which when you attempt to strike up a convo at the coffee shop it does not make you look friendly or interesting anymore, it just makes you look a bit creepy.

3. Your physical health is at its peak from all of those intramural sports and biking to class. And walking to the bar.  Yes, your weekend (or weekday) jaunts to the bar are keeping you more fit than you’re likely be able to maintain when you’re in the work world.  Okay, your collagen levels might play a teeny factor here too, but even taking into account the Freshman Fifteen, trust me, that is nothing compared to the adult obesity that awaits later.  Parental potbelly.  The Adult abdomen. The stretched-out stomach. It’s coming for you.

4. Two words: Study Abroad.  Drink a Guinness in Dublin, drink a Tusker in Nairobi, drink a cappucini in Rome.  Hit up a few museums and classes while you’re there, extend your return flight home and go backpacking.  I took a six-credit month-long wildlife management course in Kenya (of which only 3 of those credits actually applied to my major) and the ten hours worth of safari each day was worth every penny.  I will never forget crawling into the dung huts built by the Masai Mara, the way a lioness looks when she is protecting her three baby cubs, or how to say elephant in Swahili. Take out the freaking loan, you can pay those bitches off for the rest of your life and the experience you’ll gain is worth every penny.  Students loans are considered the good kind of debt anyway, right?

5. 40 hour work weeks really suck.  And, newsflash! They are usually longer than 40 hours.  No matter what kind of job you have, and how passionate you are about what you do, it is still WORK, which often means boatloads of meetings and never-ending piles of forms.  You might not love writing college papers, but know that those don’t suck your soul out through your fingers with as much voracity as work papers will.

So, what will your next major be?

Photo credit: Wikipedia

Photo credit: Wikipedia

SHARING IS CARING!Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

0 thoughts on “5 Reasons to Change Your Major and Stay in College For a Few More Years

Leave a Reply